offer

Autopsy of a great landing page execution

This morning, Marketo announced the online availability of The Definitive Guide to Lead Nurturing, a comprehensive Marketo workbook that delivers the practical advice and do-it-yourself guidance required to turn lead nurturing theory into practice. This is definitely a must read guide for anyone interested about lead nurturing.

The news is spread all over Twitter, which is good. But what really caught my attention is Marketo’s landing page execution. They really did a great job at capturing leads. The sequence is made of 3 pages and here are my observations for each one.

Marketo Landing Page 1

Marketo Landing Page 1

Landing page 1: Complete guide offer

The page has a quick description of the offer and why it is valuable. The guide is divided in 4 parts. The first part is given without registering (see red arrow on the left).

The second, third and fourth part will also be given but at a future date (see 3 red arrows on the right). Now that is the reason why the lead should complete the form. The compelling offer here is to register to get the full guide now. They are giving the lead a powerful incentive to register: get it now!

Second point, the form to capture information is located at the top right of the page. That make sure it is easy for the lead to see it and complete it to get the full version of the guide.

Third point: the most important content is above the fold (green line on the screenshot).

Lastly, they added trusted source to endorse the guide and gives a lot of credibility on the value of the content.

Quick comment about the menus: It is recommended that you strip any menus on your landing pages to make sure leads only go where you want them to go. But I would only recommend that if lead are coming from your website and already know you. In this case, the page is promoted in PR and is retweeted a lot. So a lot of visitors don’t know Marketo yet and this is why is better to leave all menus.

Marketo landing page 2

Landing page 2: Webinar offer

Instead of being redirected to a classical Thank you page after completing the form, the lead is taken to a second offer. This offer is directly related to the first one, in fact, it is a Webinar about the guide that the lead just downloaded. If the lead is interested to the guide, he will most probably be interested in the Webinar about the guide.

The cool thing about the landing page flow is that Marketo is using progressive profiling. Progressive profiling is the technique use to ask new questions to a lead when he come back.  Now on this second form, Marketo ask for State, # Employees, Industry.  This is a very good way to build leads profile without annoying them with all the same question again and again.

Note that now the header has change and there is no menus available. The lead now knows Marketo and is pushed in the direction where Marketo wants it.

Marketo landing page 3

Marketo landing page 3

Landing page 3: Thank you + blog subscription offer

Now that the lead has register to get the complete guide and to attend the Webinar, it is the time to thank the lead. But instead of leaving it there, Marketo just added a little extra, which does not require registering with them. They simply offer a quick RSS subscription to their blog, very little engagement from the lead but very valuable for Marketo to increase their blog subscription base.

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The value of a phone call to generate sales: 280$

Online Marketing the weapon to generate leads. But when it come down to generate actual sales, nothing can beat a phone call in the lead nurturing process.  Here a B2C example that worked:

I was having a beer with friends on a Friday happy hour when I suddenly receive a call from a Mexx clothing store. The person told me that a super 50% sale on everything was starting today. The person made me feel unique by telling me that this offer was for selected clients. I asked her what “Selected” mean and she says that because I had already purchased at their store, my name was in their database and they were contacting all of their customers.

Never the less, the day after, I went to the store, which is a 30 minutes drive from my home and I bought for 280$ of shirts and pants. On my way back, I drove by another Mexx store, literally 5 minute walk away from my home in Montreal and I realized that the super 50% sales was actually in every Mexx stores.

That made me wonder why I went so far when I could have go there at the first place. Furthermore, why did I actually buy some cloths? I was absolutely not planning any clothing purchase…

And because I’m a marketer and like this kind of situation, I dug a little deeper. I looked in my emails (I’m a subscriber to Mexx newsletter) and realized that I also received an email announcing about the 50% sales few days prior.

But neither the email nor the closest store made me think about purchasing cloths. The only driver is the phone call. Sure the 50% offer is very compelling, but I was exposed to it on other channel and it did not trigger the desire to buy.

I drove 30 minutes to spent 280$ simply because I got nurtured by phone. Period.

Lead Nurturing + Right Channel + Right Messaging or Compelling Offer = Sales

And Yes the phone is a strong channel when properly used…

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Tuesday, June 30th, 2009 Lead Management, Marketing 3,618 Comments

How much does a Hot Chocolate worth? At least 40$!

About 2 weeks before Christmas, my girlfriend and I were walking on the Street by a cold December day. Suddenly, a girl in front of a chocolate store offered us a free hot chocolate. No obligation. All we had to do was to walk in the store to pick it up. On our way in, we noticed all their Christmas shape chocolate. It was like fine art! We picked up our drinks and left without buying anything.

One week later, my girlfriend was still looking for last minute gifts and she suddenly remembered the Chocolate Store. She went back and actually bought for more than 40$ of chocolate gifts.

The initial offer was pleasant enough so we remembered it very well. If the offer would have been something like “Get a free Hot chocolate with a 10$ purchase” for example, we would have not even walk in the first time…

Marketing is all about creating a relation with customers. Not generating immediate revenues. I know it is kind of obvious, but I though a simple day-to-day life experience was cool to remind all of us!

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Friday, January 16th, 2009 Marketing 3,427 Comments